Archive for the ‘The 3rd Button’ Category

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The Truth Will Win Out – Sooner Not Later

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Immediate access to the world’s information means a bit of retraining for those of us who grew up in the one-way persuasion school of marketing. The task before us is to adjust to the much more challenging “interactive-objective” school of marketing.

Today, our claims cannot simply be louder than our competitors to win out. Our customers can easily find out how our product or service actually performs- and trust me, if it’s at all important to them, they’ll be checking. If you’ve misled them through your claims in any way, they’ll know. If you’ve mislead them, they’ll leave- and they won’t be back.

This last ‘they’re not coming back’ observation is important. Too often, marketers act as if there are only two possible outcomes to an activity on their part- it works or it doesn’t- a one or a zero. If only life were that simple and binary. The reality is that if you set up an expectation you can’t meet or, worse, you actively mislead, you may never see those customers again. No matter what you say or do, they will be lost to you forever- and even the quietest of them will take a few friends with them on their way out.

It is critical to your success to make the most of this new reality of open access to information. Use truth as a marketing tool.

A few years ago a BMW die-hard compared the official BMW website to his favorite BMW enthusiast site. At the time, the BMW site was recognized as being at the leading edge of the art. But this person’s perspective was different. He liked the corporate site, but found it too one-sided, too perfect and too sleek. By comparison, the enthusiast site was more ‘real,’ more down to earth. The contributors loved the brand, but they loved it in its entirety- warts and all. They didn’t shy away from the imperfections, but celebrated them. The net result was a much more honest, emotionally engaging and deeper conversation about the BMW brand.

There is nothing wrong with perfection, but don’t allow it to blind you to passion. Embrace the truth in your brand, allowing your customer to believe you and incite an honest passion.

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling strategy

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Now UP! on Design Matters

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Louise

Celebrate the 10 year anniversary of Design Matters with a fantastic conversation between Debbie and designer Louise Sandhaus.

Educator, Partner and Author – Louise teaches at CalArts, works with prestigious clients such as the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and Los Angeles World Airports, and has recently published the book Earthquakes, Mudslides, Fires & Riots: California and Graphic Design 1936 – 1986.

Click here to listen to the podcast<<

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It Takes a Village to Raise a Brand

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Great brands are built as much (if not more) by their audiences as by their managers. The manager can only create the stimulus; the audience filters that stimulus and provides a response. Only the marketplace can make your product or service into a brand. Participation is key.

What this means is that the brand marketer has to give up some control to his or her ‘community.’ In many categories, the marketer can be highly rewarded if a sense of shared ownership with the community is created.jordan

The Jordan brand is the best basketball shoe available, but that’s not why it’s such big business. It’s big because its community loves it. The community sustains the brand. Go online and tune into that community- you’ll be amazed by its attachment to it and involvement in its journey.

Smart marketers like Nike know they have to work with their community to build the brand. But they also know- though they don’t always like it- that they must give up some control of their destiny to that community. And needless to say, they must never, ever betray the trust of that community.

Your community isn’t naive. It knows you are in business to make money. It just needs to believe that you also have its best interests at heart. It wants to know that you truly share its passion.

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eBay is a fascinating example of a closely integrated community building a business and brand. Part of the genius of the eBay model was that it had a massive network of unsalaried brand advocates and business strategists, all deliberately or inadvertently dreaming up ways to develop new revenue sources and deepen brand loyalty.

As eBay grew, its community has given way to a loosely aligned eBay ‘nation’ filled with thousands of communities that have built up around specific passion points. This online retail community mentality can and has translated to the successful launch of subsequent businesses- Etsy comes to mind- where brand engagement and brand success are reciprocal, born of participation and innate openness. This is a model integral to success in a technology-based marketplace.

Treat your brand as a village rather than a city. Assume everyone knows everyone else. You need to learn the language in order to be welcome. You need to get to know your brand’s village elders and meet with them. They are wise and passionate, and they love to tell the story of your brand as well as stories of the village.

Most importantly, don’t try to directly influence the community. Listen and learn from their conversations, and continue to share your passion in authentic, meaningful ways. Then watch as the village raises up your brand.

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling’s Strategy team

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Sterling Buzz…

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Check out our delicious, newly launched designs!

Sterling has gone artisan with the new Häagen-Dazs packaging and is helping Edy’s/Dreyers bring the joys of frozen custard to homes across the country!

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Now UP on Design Matters…

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

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This week on Design Matters, Debbie talks with Jessica Walsh and Timothy Goodman about their unique collaboration… find out more here.

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Marketing in a World of Ubiquitous Information

Tuesday, March 10th, 2015

The information on brands that is now available via the Internet brings with it a new approach to marketing. As marketers we must now actively manage noise, recognize and deal with lies, we must actively promote the truth- but ultimately, we must abandon the traditional, one-sided model of marketing known as “persuasion.” Product performance claims will be increasingly transparent to prospective customers. And once the truth is known, those customers will feel betrayed if they are lied to… and they will never return.

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Whether it’s a new car or a pair of jeans, shopping is just an equation that balances degree of importance against ease of information access. Soon no one will buy a durable good without first doing a little homework. Customers will do the online research and use digital channels to tell their friends. Transparency becomes assumed, and not making this assumption invites difficulty.

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Your product doesn’t perform? Your service sucks? Before you know it a quiet buzz will be felt on the Internet. This type of buzz could leak onto influential blogs and with a day- hell even within hours- a lot of hard work and good thinking will be completely undone by the very people you were counting on to build your business.

On a positive note, if you product delights the customer or your service over-delivers, you’ll quickly find the tide of information working on your behalf. This is not a new phenomenon. Word of mouth has always been the most powerful marketing mechanism, but now it’s accelerated and universal. We have more “friends” than we ever dreamed of having, and we are instantly connected to information, opinion and expertise, wherever and whenever we want.

These days, your customers are knocking on your door and you have to let them in- and they’d better like what they see. We’ve always understood outbound marketing, but the best practices of inbound marketing are still unfolding before our eyes.

Marketing is good. Persuasion is good. Brands count. But also know that the facts will matter. Those facts, as seen from several different vantage points, will be applied ruthlessly and at great speed.

Be ready.

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling’s strategy team

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Advertising, and the Need for Radical Re-engineering

Monday, March 2nd, 2015

It was the worst of times; it was the worst of times… (with apologies to Charles Dickens)

Now, I’m going to bring together all of my thoughts on advertising in one place. Brace yourself.

Once upon a time, “the target” sat at home watching television, namely the big 3 networks- ABC, NBC or CBS. Wives were at home during the day, and husbands would slump into recliners at the end of their work day. You had to get up to change the channel. The audience was captive and predictable. Other media like radio, newspapers and magazines worked in support of a much less cluttered media environment.

Let’s fast-forward to the present. Traditional television is on the way out as advertising’s biggest money-maker. Most channels have no real meaning. The internet is our main line to content of all sorts to suit our desires.

These days, technology can organize content to create personal channels and it can also link that content with personally relevant advertising – or no advertising at all. In this way, the advertising that once funded the networks has become just more content, and technology now plays the organizational role formerly played by networks and advertising agencies.

More and more technological advancements are allowing customers to bypass advertising altogether- beyond pirating sites, customers will soon be able to purchase all of their content for a $1 fee and enjoy content that is ad-free. Content that comes for free increasingly provides users the choice of ads they must view- and guess what they will do? They’ll choose to be entertained or informed on the subjects they already prefer.

So we’ll have to get creative in this future world, where the old advertising market will be officially dead. The new communication agencies are filled with bright young “media” specialists who are armed with a blend of creative, technological and CRM-style skills. They are as comfortable with ROI and algorithms as they are with getting inside the psyche of their customer.

It will be fascinating to watch the Internet develop as the delivery vehicle for content, and see who ends up driving the ship: Apple, Google, Facebook, Amazon, or a brand new entity.

As always with technology, those in the middle are in for a heap of change and possibly a heap of trouble. They will have to radically redefine their roles if they are to prosper. The countdown has already begun.

Yes, everyone is already betting on the Big Four, but history also suggests that we keep our eyes on a range of companies that none of us have heard of… yet.

Just remember: the future is a very fast jet plane. Once you hear it, it’s already gone past.

Austin McGhie is Sterling’s head of Strategy

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Assume You’ll Only Get One Shot

Tuesday, February 17th, 2015

“Having lost sight of our objectives, we redoubled our efforts.

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If we don’t have the time to get it right up front, how is it that we find the time to fix it later? If there is a single message I hope to impart to you it’s this: don’t say anything, don’t do anything, until you’re convinced that you have everything right. Don’t execute a communications campaign (spending big money on ad space or time) unless you’re sure of your strategy and have perfected your tactics and tools.

Is your advertisement going to cut through the noise? If not, tell your agency the plan is on hold (as is some portion of their compensation) until it’s ready. The same goes for all areas of marketing communication. Needless to say, this approach will also add significant incentive for your communication partners to get it right.

Here’s the important part – the difficult part: Have the nerve to hold back until you feel the campaign/plan is perfect- until you have no reservations about it. There will be forces pushing for you to give the green light. Resist until you are ready.

Which seems like the more intelligent choice: To launch an acceptable campaign in May or launch a great campaign in July? It’s the difference of being invisible or getting noticed in the real world. It’s worth the wait. Try thinking of these as binary choices, between a 0 and a 1, because that’s closer to the reality of market impact than any incrementalist model.

Real marketing communication always does better when it moves from blunt instrument to scalpel. Blunt instruments need too much force behind them to work, whereas a scalpel just needs a perfect cutting edge. Start sharpening, and don’t cut until you find that edge.

Stay tuned for more from Austin McGhie, head of Sterling Strategy, on aligning your strategy with creative execution.

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Happy 10 Years, Design Matters!

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

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A decade before the so-called golden age of podcasting… Debbie Millman launched the world’s first podcast about design, armed with nothing more than an idea, a telephone line, and ample doggedness.”

This week we celebrate the 10th Birthday for Design Matters with Debbie Millman: a series of sometimes funny, sometimes poignant, always inspiring podcasts on design and the world affected by design.

Above: a portion of the poster Debbie designed, celebrating 10 YEARS of Design Matters

>>click here to keep celebrating

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The Dollar Value of Creativity

Monday, February 2nd, 2015

Here’s the thing about strategy. The people who matter, your customers, never see it.

Real people experience your product or service- the see, feel and touch your tactics- but they never, ever see your strategy. The corollary of this observation is that it can only be great strategy if it makes for great tactics. This one’s worth repeating:

It’s only great strategy if it makes for great tactics.

When I worked in the ad business, every now and then I’d hear people both inside and outside the agency say something along the lines of “Yeah, I know the strategy’s a bit flat, but the creative team will bring it to life.” That is dangerously lazy and wrong thinking.

Great positioning strategies are creative in their own right. When the strategy is great, it ends up being something fun and easy to communicate just as an idea. You will know that idea will provoke, maybe even disrupt. That idea will demand a response from the target audience- even when it’s still a raw idea, before it becomes a beautifully finished piece of communication. When you have a great strategy, you can already see the advertising, events and promotions falling into place.

When someone in a long-ago meeting suggested positioning 7-Up as “The Uncola,” everyone there knew that a breakthrough had been made, and that powerful communication programs would be an inevitable outcome. Similarly, Sterling Brands helped the Dove brand team create the “Real Beauty” strategy that has guided their brand so effectively, and Ogilvy & Mather (and others) created the communications programs that made it count.

Great positions are themselves marketable ideas. If you can’t immediately see the path from a positioning strategy to its tactics, you’ve probably got some work left to do on the strategy itself.

Creativity has greater dollar value in the marketplace today than ever before. The creativity that later lends itself to effective tactics, to the amplified effects of people sharing your ads around the Internet, to an event or experience that feels ‘just right’ to your target audience- all begins in your positioning. And in an Internet-based global economy, creativity has become the competitive differentiator.

For brands this means that you should seek out partners and people who are truly creative, but also smart enough to get strategy. They are few and far in between, so treat them well. They are the few who will make a difference in this new marketplace – and that difference is only going to get bigger.

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling Strategy