Archive for the ‘The 3rd Button’ Category

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Sterling Buzz…

Friday, October 24th, 2014

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We’re happy to share the findings of some fascinating research conducted by Google in partnership with Ipsos and Sterling Brands! Now we can say without a doubt, that digital research has become more important than ever in combination with in-store shopping and linking consumers to local stores.

“Eighty-seven percent of shoppers research before visiting a store, 79% search during their visit and 35% look after, according to research released today by Google, based on an online survey of 6,000 smartphone users conducted in partnership with Ipsos MediaCT and Sterling Brands.” -AdAge

Click here to read the full findings from the study

And in a related story published by AdAge, retailer Macy’s has used these Google digital search findings to bolster local inventory ads to highlight what’s in local stores for shoppers who use devices to plan and complete a purchase. Read more on that story here<<

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Now UP! On Design Matters…

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014
Petter Ringbom is a New York-based director of documentary and narrative films. His latest film, Shield and Spear, premiered at Hot Docs and has screened at Sheffield Doc/Fest, Durban International Film Festival, and as part of Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Sound + Vision. Petter was a Film Independent Fast Track Fellow for 2013, and is currently a creative advisor for the design and innovation firm, Openbox.
Check out his great conversation with Debbie by clicking here<<

Petter

Petter Ringbom is a New York-based director of documentary and narrative films. His latest film, Shield and Spear, premiered at Hot Docs and has screened at Sheffield Doc/Fest, Durban International Film Festival, and as part of Film Society of Lincoln Center’s Sound + Vision. Petter was a Film Independent Fast Track Fellow for 2013, and is currently a creative advisor for the design and innovation firm, Openbox.

Check out his great conversation with Debbie by clicking here<<

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Customers Not Marketing Advisors

Monday, October 20th, 2014

There is a critically important and logical order implied when it comes to strategy development, a priority that is often ignored by marketers, strategy consultants and (especially) communication agencies. It is a simple syllogism that goes like this:

-Know where your differentiated advantages lie

-Know what you need to do to win the game

-Then go to your customer and find out how to win

Rely on business strategy, competitive advantage and marketplace dynamics to tell you what to do, not the customer. Instead, the customer should tell you how to do it.

To find your strategy, there a number of things you must do, and an order in which customer feedback comes into play:

1.) Look Inside. Based on the vision and core capabilities of your organization, your competitive advantage and what you see as prevailing marketplace trends, determine  the strategic alternative or alternatives that are best for you from a long-term, bottom-line perspective. I’m making this sound easy, but finding the strategy that brings all of this together in one idea is a real art.

2.) Determine which strategy is best. It’s OK to talk to your customer to determine how to refine that strategy. Will they give you permission? Where does that permission start and where does it end? What sort of stimulus do you need to get the response that they’ve indicated they’re capable of?

3.) Find the easiest path to implement your strategy. Customer research is all about finding the easiest path, in that it allows you to find natural marketplace momentum and use it to your advantage.

To put it simply, don’t ask the customer – “Do you like this ad?” Ask them “Does this motivate you to do/buy X?” Customers are not marketing advisors, but they will tell you what they will or wont do.

Norwegian Cruise Lines once embarked on a beautiful, award-winning advertising campaign designed to entice young people to take cruises. The company essentially ignored the competitive realities of its own business. Surveys found that young people loved the ads- and so the campaign went full steam ahead.

But “Do you like the ads?” was the wrong question. “Will you go on a cruise?” was the right question. An even more critical question should have been posed to the older people who really do go on cruises, and that was: “Will this ad campaign scare you away?” Unfortunately, the answer was: yes. Older folks stayed away from Norwegian in droves while only a trickle of young people took the plunge. Bad for Norwegian. Good for its competitors, who had stuck to marketing to those older cruise takers.

Remember to develop yours strategy first, then go to marketing. And, if you are going to talk to your customer, ask the right questions.

Austin McGhie is Sterling’s head of Strategy

Next week we take a deeper look at research and its rightful role in support of brand strategy.

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Your Customer is a Cynic

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

As a marketer, you are positioning something to someone. As we speak, that someone is changing his attitude. Changing her outlook. Some of that change is just a result of his or her last conversation with a friend and some is more deeply felt and therefore permanent. One permanent change is that consumers have increasingly adopted the attitude and behavior of professional cynics.

Blame it on the Internet. Blame it on the press or the school system. Blame it on Wall Street. Blame it on marketers who chronically over-promise and under-deliver. You can blame it on the government, too. The undeniable fact is that the modern consumer is a cynic. And this is definitely not a temporary state of affairs, a fleeting reaction to our times. Access to information and a broad range of perspectives is the real breeding ground for this cynicism- as it damn well should be.

People ‘Occupy Wall Street’ because they are losing faith in our institutions. The more they know about big business, the less they seem to like. In the words of GE CEO Jeff Immelt: “Businesses today aren’t admired. Size is not respected. There’s a bigger gulf today between haves and have-nots than ever before. It’s up to us to use our platform to be a good citizen. Because not only is it a nice thing to do, it’s a business imperative.”

Two points:

-The first is that in today’s market, product quality is less in doubt. The range of available quality is tighter. Big is no longer better. Meanwhile, small can mean handcrafted and suggest pride.

-Second, social consciousness is becoming a growing element of any purchase decision. With information availability comes transparency- the ability to see beyond the product and customer service walls of an organization to the values behind them. Share a company’s values and you are more likely to buy its products. Don’t share them and you are less likely to buy. Really dislike those values and you may actively work to convince others not to buy the product.

These days you have to respect and work with the cynicism of the marketplace. Respect the knowledge of your audience, and respect the healthy skepticism with which it views marketing.

To corrupt a much-used quote from David Ogilvy: “The customer is not a moron. The customer is you.”

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling Strategy

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Design Matters is BACK!

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Design Matters with Debbie Millman’s new fall schedule has been announced!

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Tune in right now for the latest episode featuring a true pioneer in American graphic design– Tom Geismar.

>>Click here to listen now


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The Consumer is Dead

Monday, October 6th, 2014

For what it’s worth, the term ‘consumer’ really irritates me. I still use it to make myself understood, but it bugs me. With time, I’ve concluded that the word bugs me for strategic reasons- not just because I don’t like the word itself.

‘Consumer’ conjures up a mass of people ready to blindly ‘consume’ my product. By comparison, the word ‘customer’ seems more singular and implies a relationship of some kind. Consumers consume. Customers purchase- if they are treated right. Consumers are the way of the past. Customers are the wave of the future.

This makes a difference on a couple of fronts. Right now, retailers have customers and most of their suppliers have consumers. For structural reasons, but also because of this schizoid mindset, the retailer often has a much stronger relationship with that person than does the manufacturer. Over time, this almost always leads the retailer to become a more trusted ‘guarantor’ of product quality than the manufacturer. Ultimately, this means that the retailer can source products and build brands that the customer trusts more than those from the manufacturer- and they’ll be cheaper for many of the same structural reasons.

I believe everyone needs to build a real, working customer relationship management (CRM) strategy. Forget the software for now; just embrace the theory. In the old world, terms like 1:1 marketing, segmentation and mass marketing were too often viewed as distinct alternatives. The fact is, for many marketers, inside their customer database reside customers who deserve to be handled 1:1 and can be profitably marketed to this way, customers who can be approached on a segment basis, and customers who can only be profitable if they’re treated en masse.

Depending on your business, you may even be able to determine the unprofitable customer- and although all consumers may seem like they are worth having, some are definitely best sent over to your competition.

So, let’s stop thinking about the people buying our products and services as consumers and promote them to the exalted status of customer… and then we can all go back to fighting over them.

If you’re a manufacturer and this creates confusion with intermediates such as retailers, who you currently call customers, I have another suggestion. Call them partners and treat them accordingly.

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling Strategy. Stay tuned for a continued, in-depth take on the customer all month long.

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Make Yourself Famous

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

“I’m gonna live forever. Baby, remember my name.” - Irene Cara, Fame

It’s okay; admit it. You’d like to be famous. You want to succeed. You want to make a difference. You want to win.

Well, act like it! I think that anyone with ambition wants to make a difference. That said, for some reason, most of us simply don’t act that way. We’re just not ruthless enough. We let politics, niceties, organizational structure and time itself get in the way of doing what it takes to win. We’ve all seen managers make the easier choice, one that leads to losing, instead of the tough decision that might lead to winning.

Over the course of a year, a senior marketer will face a host of little decisions and only a couple of make-or-break decisions. The trick is to make the small ones quickly and intuitively to only get the majority right- and then fix the minority that prove to be wrong. Bat above .500 on the small stuff and you’ll be just fine.

By comparison, you simply cannot get the big stuff wrong. Here, you have to be completely ruthless. Think about these decisions, but then make them boldly. Make them count for something. Make the big decisions in the right ways, and you could become famous. Always adopt that attitude, even if it’s unlikely that you’ll really become famous.

One illustration close to my heart is found in advertising.

I’m all for ongoing agency of record relationships – but it needs to be based on performance. Once every few years a business needs a brand new campaign, a campaign that could possibly transform the business. You’ve seen it happen in the past:

-McDonald’s turns a few syllables into a more contemporary position

-A real live Jack helps save Jack in the Box

-A gecko transforms the culture of an insurance company

-An introduction to The Most Interesting Man in the World pushes Dos Equis into the spotlight

-A new Old Spice Guy ressurrects a brand on life support

These campaigns can transform a business, but we also know that they are a distinct minority.

So when you arrive at an inflection point and need the campaign to make you famous, you need to be ruthless. For example, offer a couple million dollars to the top three creative agencies in the country. Better still, locate the top three creative teams in the country and make the offer to them directly. Winner take all. Once it successfully runs, thank the creators for their work, pay the winner, and tell your agency of record to get back to work.

On the other hand, if the winning campaign idea is merely good, and not the earthshaking concept you need, do not say yes. Start over, and over- until you are truly ready to make history.

Keep in mind this is an inflection point for the entire business. A chance to elevate. How can you not do everything possible to create this kind of marketplace leverage- including putting your maintenance agency on hold and rewarding one of its competitors for a great idea? Your job is to succeed, not to protect the feelings of your partners. Your partners are smart. They’ll get it, even if they don’t like it.

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling Strategy

Stay tuned as we turn to thoughts on the customer in the coming weeks…

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Sterling Buzz…

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

Working with Hershey Global Design, Sterling Brands has created some fantastic and sustainable new packaging for Hershey’s Miniatures!

Check out our design and sustainability details below and click here to compare the new with the old, and learn more about this great design story!

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Fail Safe

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

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“Several years ago, Steve Heller asked me to contribute to a book titled: Design Disasters: Great Designers, Fabulous Failure, and Lessons Learned. In thinking of the myriad failures I had experienced over the course of my life thus far, I decided to write about my biggest failure of all: my complete lack of belief in pursuing my original dreams.” — Debbie Millman

The effort resulted in a stunning and personal visual essay that was then featured in Debbie’s book Look Both Ways, and as a commencement speech at San Jose State University.

Now, in it’s fourth reincarnation, Debbie’s thoughts on Failure can be viewed in a fully-synched audio/visual experience by clicking here<<

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Build an Experience

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

A brand is a promise of a customer experience.

This definition should be fairly obvious when you look at immersive or experiential brands such as retailers (and many services). But it is also at play in a more subtle way in even the simplest product categories.

In these more subtle cases, you may have to shift your mindset from that of a consumer buying your product to that of a consumer experiencing your brand. In order to do this, try walking through a real shopping experience, from start to finish, with an assortment of your customers. Map the ‘experience trail’ for each. Where are the highs? The magic moments? How can you take advantage of them? Showcase them? Where are the lows? The dissatisfiers? How can you fix them?

A great example is when I once walked through a bunch of department stores with a group of women shopping for apparel. Stores like these still separate their apparel into departments with anachronistic titles from the 1950s, such as ‘misses,’ ‘petites,’ ‘juniors,’ and ‘women’s.’ The conversations you hear in these walk throughs are a complete downer, as women describe one section as meant for ‘older, bigger women,’ and wistfully recall the days they fit into anything from the colorful, ‘junior’s’ department. The worst thing about this scenario is that just down the mall corridor are specialty stores such as the Gap, where all women are treated exactly the same, regardless of their size.

Walk throughs like these almost always yield surprises, and often, it’s not those seemingly more critical parts of the process that please or piss off your customer, but the trivial stuff that you might have over-looked— and you can fix.

Okay, so you’ve mapped out the shopping experience step by step and you know where the issues and opportunities lie. Some questions you should now ask yourself:

-How does each step in the experience hook into the next?

-How do you maximize the efficiency of the transition from one step to the next and thereby minimize the odds of competitive intervention?

-How can you deliver each step in a way that ensures that the trail consistently delivers the desired brand experience?

The next step is to map out your competitor’s brand experience. Where are their customers most vulnerable? What are their competitive strengths? What are the weaknesses you can exploit?

Look at your brand as an experience rather than a product or service. See it through the eyes of your customer. Pull that experience apart, get it right- both step by step and as a whole- and then put it back together again.

Austin McGhie is head of Sterling Brands’ Strategy team